Evolution of Journalism

 

The field of journalism is ever evolving.  Over the past few decades the way news is portrayed to an audience has changed in a lot of aspects.

No longer are newspapers and television the only way to get news.  Online media along with the rise of mobile news have changed the landscape of the journalism profession.

It’s only logical to believe that mobile and online sources will become the leader in the ways to access your daily/weekly news.

However, I don’t think that newspaper and television news isn’t relevant anymore.

The rise of tablets and smartphones are the main contributing factor when it comes to the increase in mobile news.

But, mobile news isn’t replacing the old ways of receiving news they are aiding it.  43% of tablet users say they are adding to their news consumption with a mobile device, not replacing it.

One good example of this is the “Second Screen Phenomenon.”  This is the idea that people watching the news on television also have their laptops open viewing news on both screens.

This is a goldmine for news and ad promoters.  Having two screens active gives journalists a way to interact with their readers in many different ways, especially if the event is live.

Social media is also throwing its hat in the ring of ways to get news.  In 2012 almost 19% of consumers say news on a social media outlet “yesterday,” according to a study done by Pew Research Center.

This is a major step up from that figure in 2010 that was only around nine percent.

Social media outlets like Facebook and Twitter have come out with lots of different ways to aid journalists in the past few years.

Things like subscriptions on Facebook, video posting on Twitter, and a new search engine on Facebook, that have made it easier for journalists to get their news out.

But, focusing on just the two powerhouse social media sites isn’t enough anymore.  Using other sites is going to be a necessity in the coming years.

Digital advertising is another huge part of the media experience.  But the problem isn’t with the digital ads.  It’s with who controls them.

For the first time since 2011, digital ads outplaced newspaper ads.  But, the main problem is that the “online titans” like Facebook, Google, and Yahoo control the majority of the income from digital ads.

The amount of money that these major corporations make off digital ads leaves little to no room for news companies to make any money.

One part of digital advertising that is booming in growth is video advertisements online.

A lot of Americans watch online videos on a daily basis.  The ways to advertise on videos online are endless.  Whether it be videos, streams, or news online video advertisements are becoming more and more important.

Lastly, one of the newer forms of getting news out are apps running on HTML5.

These programs are web apps that function like apps you would buy in the App Store or Android Market, but you don’t have to download them they are online based.

The limited amount of time and examples haven’t yet given a clear answer whether apps running on HTML5 are cost effective or not.  But only time will tell.

Overall, media and journalism are evolving more than we know.  It’s not that it’s shifting totally one way or the other, it’s just that we, as journalists, need to be versed in every different outlet of media.

Click Here to see an example of how mobile ads are changing the social media landscape.

Newspapers aren’t dying out.  Click Here to see a few success stories of newspapers in smaller markets that are still going strong.

Snow Fall: Redux

First, I want to say that this was easily one of the best and most well written stories I’ve ever read.  When I first looked at it I realized the length and almost dreaded starting it.  But once I got started it just rolled along so quickly. 

            What blew me away about his piece was the enormity of the story and all of its details.  The way it was written gave great insight to what actually happened. 

            One thing I noticed was how the story itself was structured.  It started with an excerpt from Elyse Saugstad, one of the skiers.  It detailed what was going through her mind after this avalanche had hit. 

But after that it almost started the story over and worked its way back to that moment.  With that change up of the “story timeline” it made for a much more interesting story. 

            I think that this story basically sums up the semester so far in Online Journalism.  It shows that you have to be creative with your story.  It also shows that adding multimedia gives the story a whole different dimension. 

            The multimedia in this story was awesome.  The different videos, photos, and graphics made it much easier to follow and understand. 

The thing I liked the most was in the “Decent” part it showed pictures and names of all the members of the group, and gave perspective on who all was in the group and make it easy to identify each person. 

Giving all these different multimedia pieces throughout the story made it much easier to keep reading.    

            This story is inspiring to me as a student journalist for several reasons.  First, I can only hope to get a story like this in my lifetime. 

The emotion that I felt in this story was crazy.  It was a story that not only told a story, but also gave background on the location and other details of the background. 

            Second, I feel like this is something I want to now work towards.  Getting a story of this magnitude and having all the multimedia is something I wish for my own work. 

This makes me want to experiment with different kinds of multimedia and also work on getting more creative with the layout of my stories. 

            As a reader, I thought the story was really well written.  I thought that the media that the writer used made a different dimension of the story and helped me understand what was going on better. 

            Also, I thought that the best thing about how the story was written was how the internal timeline of the story worked.

 It bounced around, which kind of confused me at first, but once I realized how the events were playing out…I totally grasped it and appreciated it.

            Overall, this story was very powerful.  To see what went on in all these people’s minds, and how they reacted to such horrifying events, put things in perspective.

            The hardest part for me, was reading the reaction of the loved ones after the avalanche has happened.

 I can only imagine what went through their minds as they found out the people they had seen that morning weren’t coming home.      

 

If you click here you will see some of the comments on Snow Fall:  The Avalanche at Tunnel Creek

 

If you click here you can read a summary of Snow Fall:  The Avalanche at Tunnel Creek along with a few reactions

 

 

Snow Fall: Blog Post #1

5605213905_a7124c8f23First, I want to say that this was easily one of the best and most well written stories I’ve ever read. When I first looked at it I realized the length and almost dreaded starting it. But once I got started it just rolled along so quickly.
What blew me away about his piece was the enormity of the story and all of its details. The way it was written gave great insight to what actually happened.
One thing I noticed was how the story itself was structured. It started with an excerpt from Elyse Saugstad, one of the skiers. It detailed what was going through her mind after this avalanche had hit. But after that it almost started the story over and worked its way back to that moment.
I think that this story basically sums up the semester so far in Online Journalism. It shows that you have to be creative with your story. It also shows that adding multimedia gives the story a whole different dimension.
The multimedia in this story was awesome. The different videos, photos, and graphics made it much easier to follow and understand. The thing I liked the most was in the “Decent” part it showed pictures and names of all the members of the group, and gave perspective on who all was in the group and make it easy to identify each person.
This story is inspiring to me as a student journalist for several reasons. First, I can only hope to get a story like this in my lifetime. The emotion that I felt in this story was crazy. It was a story that not only told a story, but also gave background on the location and other details of the background.
Second, I feel like this is something I want to now work towards. Getting a story of this magnitude and having all the multimedia is something I wish for my own work. This makes me want to experiment with different kinds of multimedia and also work on getting more creative with the layout of my stories.
As a reader, I thought the story was really well written. I thought that the media that the writer used made a different dimension of the story and helped me understand what was going on better.
Also, I thought that the best thing about how the story was written was how the internal timeline of the story worked. It bounced around, which kind of confused me at first, but once I realized how the events were playing out…I totally grasped it and appreciated it.
Overall, this story was very powerful. To see what went on in all these people’s minds, and how they reacted to such horrifying events, put things in perspective.
The hardest part for me, was reading the reaction of the loved ones after the avalanche has happened. I can only imagine what went through their minds as they found out the people they had seen that morning weren’t coming home.

Blues are Back!

Finally, the NHL lockout is finally over.  After months of talks between the owners and the NHLPA, the two sides have finally come to a deal ending the lockout that had been in effect since Sep. 15.  The new agreement lasts for ten years and should end the possibility of another lockout anytime soon. 

            This weekend, on Saturday January 19, the puck will drop and the NHL will have the first game of the season.  Most of the players have tried to stay warmed up by playing in leagues overseas and in charity games like the one for Hurricane Sandy. 

            The season is cut incredibly short however.  Over half of the season was lost due to the lockout.  The two sides agreed to play a 48-game season that only includes about 41% of the games from a normal season. 

            Although fans had become incredibly upset, the start to the season couldn’t come soon enough.  Hockey fans everywhere were itching to see their favorite players back on the ice. 

            With the short season, it’s difficult to predict a favorite to win the Stanley Cup this season.  There are a lot of teams that look promising, including our own St. Louis Blues, but with less than half the season it’s anyone’s game. 

            Another factor that makes a short season important is injuries.  If a player gets hurt, even a moderate injury can cost him almost half the season.  It should be interesting to see how coaches handle players to make sure serious injuries don’t occur. 

            For sports fans that don’t like basketball, hockey season comes at a great time.  With football almost over and baseball starting in a couple months, fans now have another sport to watch. 

            Be sure to tune in to your favorite teams in the coming weeks, as hockey season finally gets under way!

John Burke comes to talk about Guns ‘n’ Hoses

Everybody has good ideas. But every once in awhile an idea comes along that goes above and beyond expectations.
When John Burke, former St. Louis Police Lieutenant, and a group of a men, came up with an idea for a boxing event, they had no idea the potential it had.
Burke’s team included then current mayor Vince Schoemehl, fire chief Neil Svetrimes, police chief Bob Sheetz, Grey Eagle Distributors owner Jerry Clinton and Myrl Taylor of St. Louis Amateur Boxing. Clinton was the biggest funder of the event.
The event started in 1987 as a competition between the St. Louis city and St. Louis county police officers. They would box each other and all the proceeds would go to charity.
The proceeds were donated to Backstoppers, a charity that aids the families of those lost in the line of duty.
But the event’s popularity didn’t take off like everyone thought.
“If you’d of saw the look on my face that first year…I wanted to get in there and beat somebody,” said Burke.
Over time, the event has evolved into what it is today. Guns ‘n’ Hoses is now not only just police officers. Now, the St. Louis Police Department competes against the St. Louis Fire Department.
This brings good competition because for years STLPD and STLFD haven’t really gotten along.
“You got two entities that historically don’t like each other,” said Burke. “But should something happen, they will give their life for the other.”
It’s now tradition that the event takes place on the day before Thanksgiving.
At an event like this there are a lot of risk for injury. But Guns ‘n’ Hoses does a good job of keeping fighters safe and well trained so not get hurt.
“The worst injury we’ve ever had is a broken nose. Which is nothing,” said Burke.
This year’s Guns ‘n’ Hoses takes place on Wednesday Nov. 21 at the Scottrade Center. There are a total of 21 bouts including three bouts between females.
Guns ‘n’ Hoses started as a small idea and has evolved into something nobody expected. The event started with a couple hundred people going to now over 10,000 sometimes as high as 15,000 people in attendance.
“More than the sport itself, it’s the show that sells,” said Burke.

Orioles Executive shares experience

Lee Thomas speaks to a class at Lindenwood University

“Ability can always get you to the top. But character can help you stay there.” Lee Thomas, current assistant general manager for Baltimore Orioles, said that about his career in baseball.
Thomas has experience at almost every level of baseball. He played for six Major League teams from 1961-1968. He has been selected to an All-Star team, and hit over 100 home runs in his career.
After his career as a player, he moved into a front office role. He began with the St. Louis Cardinals and worked his way up to the director of player development. He worked under the Hall of Fame manager Whitey Herzog, and played a key front-office role in the Cardinals success in the 1980s.
In June of 1988, Thomas was hired as the General Manager of the Philadelphia Phillies. In that role, he signed players such as Curt Shilling and Lenny Dykstra.
Thomas has seen baseball evolve over the past several decades.
“The game hasn’t changed, the people running it have,” said Thomas.
He has also seen the change in how teams are formed. Players are starting to come from the minor leagues instead of teams signing big named players in free agency.
“That’s why you need a good farm director and a good scout director,” said Thomas. “Cause that’s how you build.”
Thomas has also worked for the Boston Red Sox and Baltimore Orioles, both as assistant to the General Manager Dan Duquette. Duquette and Thomas have made a lot of good moves together and played a big role in the turnaround of the Baltimore Orioles.
“We just brought up Manny Machado. He turned our team around defensively,” said Thomas. “He was excellent.”
Duquette and Thomas work hand in hand to make moves that will have a positive impact on the team.
“It’s clear that Lee is a trusted friend and advisor to Duquette and they worked together in Boston before,” said Steve Melewski, Baltimore Blogger/Writer. “Lee has a long and impressive resume in the game and is someone I’m sure Duquette can bounce ideas off and get input from often.”
The Orioles turnaround this season was one of the most historic in Major League history. Thomas and Duquette played a major role in making that happen.
“I think the front office played a huge role in turning around the team,” said Manny Flores, avid Orioles fan and St. Charles resident. “The moves they made signing a new manager and players made a huge difference.”
Thomas’s experience as a player and in the front office has given him the tools to be a great asset to any team.
It all goes back to his character that has allowed him to stay at the top for so long.

Rick Zombo Profile

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            Experience is invaluable.  Rick Zombo, the head coach for the Lindenwood University men’s ice hockey team, has plenty of experience. 

            Zombo played hockey in college for the University of North Dakota.  He played three seasons for the Fighting Sioux, including one NCAA National Championship, and then decided it was time to take the next step to the pro level.

            “It was one of the best decisions I’ve made in my life,” said Zombo.

              Zombo then went on to play 13 seasons in the NHL for three different teams:  the St. Louis Blues, Detroit Red Wings and Boston Bruins. 

            As a defenseman, Zombo was an important piece everywhere he played.  He began his career with the Detroit Red Wings. 

            “I was very popular in Detroit,” said Zombo.  “I felt like the team rolled on my shoulders.”

            After spending eight years in the Red Wings system, Zombo was traded to the Blues. 

            With St. Louis, Zombo had the opportunity to face his old team on multiple occasions.  He said there were no hard feelings between him and his old teammates. 

            “What we always did was fun,” said Zombo.  “You would always have to put money up on the chalk board.  And whoever scored the game winning goal against their old team got the money.” 

            Zombo finished up his career in Phoenix, with the Los Angeles Kings organization, after one year with the Boston Bruins. 

            After his retirement in 1998, Zombo began his coaching career. 

            His first coaching job was with the St. Louis Sting, a Tier II junior team.  He also coached at the high school level at Marquette High School in Chesterfield, Mo. 

            In 2008, Zombo became an assistant coach at LU under Derek Schaub, the current head coach at the time.  In those two seasons the team went 80-9-0 and won back-to-back ACHA championships. 

            In 2010, Zombo was announced as the second head coach of the Lions.  Zombo’s players look to him as a leader, both as a coach and a role model. 

            “As a coach he stresses the importance of success in the classroom just as much as success on the ice,” said Zach Glazer, Lions senior forward.  “Coach’s professional background in the game allows him to mold his players into respectful and responsible young men on and off the ice.”

             Zombo’s experience as a player helped him become the coach he is today.  He is still evolving as a coach.  His players believe in what he says because he has the experience to back it up.

            “Coach would do anything to help his players,” said Neeco Belanger, Lions senior forward.  “We believe in our coach, and every time he speaks we listen because he knows hockey.”